FAMILY SUPPORT

IS ESSENTIAL !

Cyberhomophobia and cybertransphobia

 

The Internet offers incredible opportunities for learning, gathering and entertaining. However, LGBTQ + people are still targeted on digital platforms, and this violence, which is rarely taken seriously, has real and harmful consequences for individuals. Since cyberhomophobia and cybertransphobia take place online, bullies do not witness the pain they cause and, therefore, it is easy for these people to continue or even intensify their attacks, which they might not do if they had the person opposite. The insults, taunts and threats circulating online hurt real people.

 

 

 

ISSUES

 

ISOLATION

Unfortunately, even today, some people cut ties, reduce contact or change their attitude after the coming out of their loved one. It is important to realize that this person is still the same you know. They are only revealing a part of their identity that you did not know. However because we live in a society where prejudice, discrimination and violence are still rampant and coming-out can be frightening, your love and support are all the more crucial.

 

REJECTION

53% of Canadians who hesitated before telling their family about their identity feared being rejected. As well as playing a very important emotional support role for people of all ages, family has great material power and authority over young people: Some LGBTQ+ youths are banned from going out, or can have their phones or computers confiscated when their parents find out about their identity. Others may be sent into conversion therapy, or may experience different types of abuse. Unfortunately, still today LGBTQ+ youth are made to leave their homes either because they have been thrown out, or because they are abused, intimidated or neglected to the point of feeling compelled to leave.

 

TRUST

For many, coming out to someone is a sign of trust. Try to live up to the trust place in you. If someone in your family comes out to you, ask them who else knows. If you're the first who've been told, or if you are amongst the few to know, it is very important not to tell others about it without the explicit consent of your loved one. Coming out is a personal process and you should respect their boundaries.

 

FULFILLMENT

Studies show that LGBTQ+ people who are well accepted by their families are happier and more fulfilled. On the contrary, LGBTQ+ people who are rejected by their families are more likely to have attempted suicide, to be depressed and to use illegal drugs.

 

 

 

ISSUES

 

ISOLATION

Unfortunately, even today, some people cut ties, reduce contact or change their attitude after the coming out of their loved one. It is important to realize that this person is still the same you know. They are only revealing a part of their identity that you did not know. However because we live in a society where prejudice, discrimination and violence are still rampant and coming-out can be frightening, your love and support are all the more crucial.

 

REJECTION

53% of Canadians who hesitated before telling their family about their identity feared being rejected. As well as playing a very important emotional support role for people of all ages, family has great material power and authority over young people: Some LGBTQ+ youths are banned from going out, or can have their phones or computers confiscated when their parents find out about their identity. Others may be sent into conversion therapy, or may experience different types of abuse. Unfortunately, still today LGBTQ+ youth are made to leave their homes either because they have been thrown out, or because they are abused, intimidated or neglected to the point of feeling compelled to leave.

 

TRUST

For many, coming out to someone is a sign of trust. Try to live up to the trust place in you. If someone in your family comes out to you, ask them who else knows. If you're the first who've been told, or if you are amongst the few to know, it is very important not to tell others about it without the explicit consent of your loved one. Coming out is a personal process and you should respect their boundaries.

 

FULFILLMENT

Studies show that LGBTQ+ people who are well accepted by their families are happier and more fulfilled. On the contrary, LGBTQ+ people who are rejected by their families are more likely to have attempted suicide, to be depressed and to use illegal drugs.

 

 

 

Ease of Canadians in 2020 to accept the LGBTQ + identity of their loved one when they come out

ISSUES

 

ISOLATION

Unfortunately, even today, some people cut ties, reduce contact or change their attitude after the coming out of their loved one. It is important to realize that this person is still the same you know. They are only revealing a part of their identity that you did not know. However because we live in a society where prejudice, discrimination and violence are still rampant and coming-out can be frightening, your love and support are all the more crucial.

 

REJECTION

53% of Canadians who hesitated before telling their family about their identity feared being rejected. As well as playing a very important emotional support role for people of all ages, family has great material power and authority over young people: Some LGBTQ+ youths are banned from going out, or can have their phones or computers confiscated when their parents find out about their identity. Others may be sent into conversion therapy, or may experience different types of abuse. Unfortunately, still today LGBTQ+ youth are made to leave their homes either because they have been thrown out, or because they are abused, intimidated or neglected to the point of feeling compelled to leave.

 

TRUST

For many, coming out to someone is a sign of trust. Try to live up to the trust place in you. If someone in your family comes out to you, ask them who else knows. If you're the first who've been told, or if you are amongst the few to know, it is very important not to tell others about it without the explicit consent of your loved one. Coming out is a personal process and you should respect their boundaries.

 

FULFILLMENT

Studies show that LGBTQ+ people who are well accepted by their families are happier and more fulfilled. On the contrary, LGBTQ+ people who are rejected by their families are more likely to have attempted suicide, to be depressed and to use illegal drugs.

 

 

 

Le saviez-vous ?

Près des deux tiers (65%) des Canadien.ne.s disent intervenir lorsqu'illes sont confronté.es à de l'homophobie dans la vie de tous les jours, mais moins de la moitié (44%) affirment le faire lorsque cela se passe sur Internet. (2015)

ISSUES

 

ISOLATION

Unfortunately, even today, some people cut ties, reduce contact or change their attitude after the coming out of their loved one. It is important to realize that this person is still the same you know. They are only revealing a part of their identity that you did not know. However because we live in a society where prejudice, discrimination and violence are still rampant and coming-out can be frightening, your love and support are all the more crucial.

 

REJECTION

53% of Canadians who hesitated before telling their family about their identity feared being rejected. As well as playing a very important emotional support role for people of all ages, family has great material power and authority over young people: Some LGBTQ+ youths are banned from going out, or can have their phones or computers confiscated when their parents find out about their identity. Others may be sent into conversion therapy, or may experience different types of abuse. Unfortunately, still today LGBTQ+ youth are made to leave their homes either because they have been thrown out, or because they are abused, intimidated or neglected to the point of feeling compelled to leave.

 

TRUST

For many, coming out to someone is a sign of trust. Try to live up to the trust place in you. If someone in your family comes out to you, ask them who else knows. If you're the first who've been told, or if you are amongst the few to know, it is very important not to tell others about it without the explicit consent of your loved one. Coming out is a personal process and you should respect their boundaries.

 

FULFILLMENT

Studies show that LGBTQ+ people who are well accepted by their families are happier and more fulfilled. On the contrary, LGBTQ+ people who are rejected by their families are more likely to have attempted suicide, to be depressed and to use illegal drugs.

 

 

 

PRIDE FLAGGING est un projet collaboratif réalisé dans le cadre du 17 mai pour enrayer la cyberhomophobie et la cybertransphobie. Activez l’extension pour navigateur sur Twitter pour identifier automatiquement les commentaires haineux et simplifier le processus de signalement.

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

RESOURCES:

For those close to LGBTQ + people: PFLAG: https://pflagcanada.ca/

To speak with someone and ask questions: Line spacing: https://interligne.co/

For LGBT families (French and English): Coalition of LGBTQ families + https://familleslgbt.org/

For LGBTQ + families: Family Equality: https://www.familyequality.org/

For children of LGBTQ + people: Colage https://www.colage.org/

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